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Nuclear radiation detectors - 4PMGDET1

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  • Number of hours

    • Lectures : 12.0
    • Tutorials : 6.0
    • Laboratory works : 4.0
    • Projects : 0
    • Internship : 0
    ECTS : 2.0

Goals

The purpose of this set of lectures is to provide the students with a description of the main detection principles for charged (electron, proton, alpha) and neutral (photon and neutrons) particles. The course presents the most common devices used in nuclear and particle physics with an emphasis on gazeous detectors, semi-conductor devices and scintillators detectors.

Contact Christophe SAGE

Content

I. Introduction

Reminder : interaction particle-matter
General operating of a detector
Statistics and error propagation
II. General characteristics of a detector

Sensitivity & linearity
Efficiency and resolution power
dead time
III. Gazeous detectors

Ionisation, excitation and recombination
electron and ion transport
Operating modes of gazeous detectors
Signal shaping and Acquisition
IV. Semi-conductor devices

Reminder: basics of semi-conductors
Characterisitics of Germanium and Silicium devices
Use for photon detection
V. Scintillator devices

General properties and classification
organic scintillators
inorganic scintillators
gazaeous scintillators
Readout and Photomultipliers



Prerequisites

Tests



Additional Information

Curriculum->GEN->Semester 8

Bibliography

  • Glenn F. KNOLL, "Radiation Detection and Measurement", John Wiley and Sons Ed., 2010
  • William R. LEO, "Techniques for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments: A How-To Approach", Springer-Verlag, 1994

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Université Grenoble Alpes